Highlighting the responsibility of online community leaders

I know I haven’t been around much; my life is busy and I don’t have the time to blog that I used to. Unfortunately, this probably isn’t going to change anytime soon.

Anyway, I’d just like to highlight a post I read today, The Importance of Leadership on Gaming Websites.

Excerpt:

The point of all of this is that, despite claims by games bloggers that they have no control over what random people say on the internet, they actually do have a lot of control over the community on their sites, without even getting into moderation: it’s all about tone.

Tone is why Destructoid and Kotaku are sexist cesspools. When you post sexist headlines like “Jade Smells Pretty at London Games Fest“, when you post pictures of booth babes that are completely irrelevant to your post, when you think the height of humor is using the word “pussy” as many times as possible, you are not only engaging in sexist behavior, you are inviting sexist people to your site and making them feel at home, while simultaneously turning away most women and non-sexist men. It is truly the editors that build their site’s communities.

Joystiq generally does not do the above things, so things are marginally more civil there. However, any time a relevant picture of a woman accompanies a post, there are always a slew of sexist comments that go unchecked. I saw this happen to two posts that went up within hours of each other; the first was about a new executive at EA, who is an older woman, and many of the comments were extremely violent and objectifying (one charming example: “I’d hit it… with a crowbar”). The other was about the Lara Croft model, and since she’s young and beautiful the comments were instead about how much they would like to fuck her. It’s true that the posts did not encourage this sort of behavior the way they might at Kotaku, but at the same time, allowing these comments to remain up does–silence is the same as agreement.

For those of you interested in issues such as video games, online communities, and/or moderation, I would highly recommend giving it a read.

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This entry was posted in Anti-oppression activism, Link Blogging, Video Games. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Highlighting the responsibility of online community leaders

  1. Kimiko says:

    >I know I haven’t been around much; my life is busy and I don’t have the time to blog that
    >I used to. Unfortunately, this probably isn’t going to change anytime soon.
    I hope you’re also enjoying things there besides being busy :)

    As for Alex’s post, yes, I read it of course. I subscribe to her blog as well :)

  2. Eleniel says:

    Hehe, thanks y’all =^-^=

  3. tekanji says:

    It figures that as soon as I say “Don’t expect posts from me!” in a post, the next day I post. I swear there’s some sort of psychological reason for that…

    Kimiko: Oh, yes. I love it here. Sometimes the busy-ness is a bit much, but I’m learning a lot and having fun doing it.

    Eleniel: It was an excellent post :)

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