Category Archives: Feminism

Batgirl fights for equal pay!

I knew that there was a reason that I loved Batgirl in the old Batman TV show. Via Feminist Gamers.

Posted in Comics, cartoons, manga, and anime, Feminism, Film and televison, Politics, USA | Comments Off

Cerise: May 2007 and Call for Submissions

The May 2007 issue is out! The theme is getting women “out there” in gaming journalism, and we have some great articles about that. We’re currently looking for submissions for our June issue. Here’s the call for submissions: Submsision deadline: … Continue reading

Posted in Feminism, Media and journalism, Tabletop RPGs, LARP, etc, Video Games | 2 Comments

Tradition and the obscuring of gender violence [Women and Violence, Part 4]

[This is part of my series on Women and Violence, which I am writing as a project for a Women Studies course I’m taking. For an explanation and information on my intentions with this series, please see the introduction.]

One of the most insidious ways of normalizing and justifying gendered violence is by tying it to tradition. By portraying perpetrators as if they were enacting the accepted practices of a culture, those in power position victims of violence not only against their victimizer, but also against the weight of a culture’s history. Additionally, “tradition” is a popular buzzword that protects a practice from interrogation, hiding it behind a shield of maintaining history or honoring ancestors. Continue reading

Posted in Abuse, rape, and domestic violence, Feminism, Racism, Women and Violence | 11 Comments

The beauty myth and character design

One of the points I constantly bring up as a barrier to gender inclusive game design is how women are hypersexualized — meaning that they are constructed to be characters whom presumably male characters would like to have sex with, … Continue reading

Posted in Feminism, Sex, sexuality, and sexual politics, The Beauty Myth, Video Games | 10 Comments

Discursive patterns regarding sexual violence [Women and Violence, Part 3]

[This is part of my series on Women and Violence, which I am writing as a project for a Women Studies course I’m taking. For an explanation and information on my intentions with this series, please see the introduction.]

A couple of disclaimers, to start:

-First, this is not about me being angry at, or blaming, any particular individuals. This is also not about placing the responsibility for a society-wide problem on these particular individuals.

-Second, this entry is for everyone to read, even though I refer to a specific example in which only a few people were involved. The point of this entry is, again, not to pin the responsibility on anyone. The point is to raise awareness of a common, problematic pattern that we all engage in.

The other day I posted this rant to my journal concerning an incident at work. I was disturbed and angry about what seems to me an instance of sexual harassment (not because it was necessarily aimed at women, but because it was sexual and it was harassment). I was also aware of the ways in which sexism played into my reaction: my first instinct was to minimize my own discomfort and stay quiet about it, though in the end I realized what I was doing and spoke up.

Several people commented on that entry (though I have since screened the comments – again, so that attention or blame is not focused on one or two people). Here is the layout of the comments as of today, April 14:

-One short thread (one person’s comment and my reply) expressing sympathy about my experience.
-One long thread that begins with a person expressing sympathy, then suggesting an alternate explanation that would excuse the anonymous man’s actions as being something other than sexual harassment. The thread continues with two other people joining in to support the idea of an alternate explanation, and the topic of my distress leaves the conversation.

Why did the conversation end up like this? Continue reading

Posted in Abuse, rape, and domestic violence, Feminism, Women and Violence | 14 Comments

Denying responsibility for sexism [Women and Violence, Part 2]

[This is part of my series on Women and Violence, which I am writing as a project for a Women Studies course I’m taking. For an explanation and information on my intentions with this series, please see the introduction.]

One of the first readings assigned for this class has been Albert Bandura’s “Selective Activation and Disengagement of Moral Control,” published in volume 46, number 1 of Journal of Social Issues. The purpose of the article is to examine how, in normal and everyday circumstances, people can commit actions that they typically consider immoral. Most of the time, barring deviant individuals, we keep ourselves in check. We decide not to commit immoral actions according to what we understand as ‘moral,’ without needing other people to force us to do so.

According to Bandura, we regulate ourselves through the use of “self-sanctions.” I guess it’s like the superego, but without dealing with issues of the unconscious. For a psychological layperson like me, it’s useful just to think of it as a conscience. Basically it means that we watch and judge ourselves, and that is what determines our behavior. So if those judgments are somehow deactivated, then we can engage in behavior that we would normally consider wrong, but without making ourselves feel shame.

This is a pretty useful concept for a class on gendered violence, because it helps explain why something normally heinous (violence, particularly sexual violence) has become so common against women. I also find it useful for wider discussions about sexism in general – why something as awful-sounding as discriminating against people based on their sex is nonetheless such a widespread part of our societies. Not by a few of the absolute worst people. Not by the people who mean to do it. But by everybody. Continue reading

Posted in Abuse, rape, and domestic violence, Feminism, Women and Violence | 13 Comments

Introduction [Women and Violence, Part 1]

This is a bit of an experiment. This quarter I’m taking a Women Studies course titled “Women and Violence.” The final project for this class is open to creative interpretation, and so I’m attempting to bring together my academic feminism … Continue reading

Posted in Abuse, rape, and domestic violence, Feminism, Women and Violence | 13 Comments

Why "feminism"?

I’ve seen the argument come up time and time again: “feminism” as a term doesn’t reach out to men (or has negative connotations), so people are uncomfortable using it. Why not call it “anti-sexism” or just merge with equalism or … Continue reading

Posted in Feminism | 4 Comments

Yes, Kotaku, you WERE the reason why we started TIN! And also, Santa is real.

Brian Crecente of Kotaku has tried to take credit for the inception of The IRIS Network. I’m not even joking: In my caveman like attempts at prodding talented, strong-voiced women into writing more vocally about gaming I have stirred the … Continue reading

Posted in Feminism, Privilege, Tabletop RPGs, LARP, etc, The Internet is Serious Business, Video Games | 18 Comments

YouTube: For Every Man Who Never Called Himself A Feminist

Posted in Feminism | 21 Comments